10 things you should know about the Nobel Prizes - History Key

10 things you should know about the Nobel Prizes

The Nobel Prize is the idea of Alfred Nobel (1833-1896) a Swedish chemist and businessman, known for the inventing the dynamite. The Nobel Prize started in 1901, after 5 years of Nobel’s death. Basically it was written in his Nobel’s the idea of the prizes. Let’s start with those 10 facts.

10. Alfred Nobel’s Testament

He introduced a clause in his testament stating that he wishes that all of his wealth to be offered each year “in form of prizes” to those who brought the greatest services to humanity in the last year. 

Alfred Nobel
Alfred Nobel © alfrednobel.org

9. Who can receive it?

Well, anyone can be at least nominated for a Nobel Prize. The prizes are given to people who made an important contribution in Chemistry, Literature, Peace, Physics or Medicine.

8. Economics

In 1968, on the occasion of 300 years since its inception, the National Bank of Sweden instituted the Economics Prize in memory of Alfred Nobel.

Headquarter of Swedish National Bank © wikipedia.org

7. Fields Medal

It is the equivalent of Nobel Prize for mathematicians.

Photo of the obverse of a Fields Medal made by Stefan Zachow for the International Mathematical Union
Photo of the obverse of a Fields Medal made by Stefan Zachow for the International Mathematical Union © wikipedia.org

6.  Annually ceremonies

Nobel Prizes are awarded annually. The Nobel Peace Prize is offered in Oslo and the other awards are given in Stockholm.

Nobel Prize Award Overview
Nobel Prize Award Overview © nobelprize.org

5. The Value

The Nobel Prize value has risen from $40,000 to the equivalent of $900,000.

A golden medallion with an embossed image of Alfred Nobel facing left in profile
A golden medallion with an embossed image of Alfred Nobel facing left in profile © wikipedia.org

4. The youngest winner

The youngest winner of the Nobel Prize winner is Lawrence Bragg. In 1915, at just 25 years, the British received the Nobel Prize in Physics.

Lawrence Bragg
Lawrence Bragg © wikimedia.org

3. The oldest winner

Leonid Hurwicz is the oldest Nobel laureate. The American-born Russian was awarded with the Nobel Prize for Economics in 2007 at the age of 90.

Leonid Hurwicz
Leonid Hurwicz © wikimedia.org

2. Men power

Most of the winners are men. For example, only two women were awarded with the Nobel for Physics. The same prize was offered to approximately 200 men over time.

1.  The first woman

Pierre and Marie Curie in the laboratory
Pierre and Marie Curie in the laboratory © wikipedia.org

Marie Curie was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize in 1903. In 1911 she won another one in Chemistry “for her discovery of radium and polonium”.

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