The Nazis Ban all the other political parties in Germany (July, 14, 1933) - History Key

The Nazis Ban all the other political parties in Germany (July, 14, 1933)

This day in history remains as one of the most critical moves that Adolf Hitler made during the Gleichschaltung. The Gleichschaltung was the process of Nazification of Germany which established the totalitarian system and the control over all aspects of the German society.

On July 14, 1933, Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Party officially pronounced itself as the only legal political party in Germany. Any other party from that day is outlawed and drastic measures could be made in order to maintain the singularity of the party.

Hitler with Nazi Party members in 1930
Hitler with Nazi Party members in 1930 © Bundesarchiv, Bild 119-0289/CC BY-SA 3.0 de/Image Source: Wikipedia

Democratic rise of Adolf Hitler

At first, let’s get back to the rise of Adolf Hitler. As you probably know, he fought for his country during WWI and his comrades were impressed by his actions during the war. After WWI, Hitler was devastated after the Treaty of Versailles, when Germany surrendered and accepted the terms.

Hitler (far right, seated) with his army comrades of the Bavarian Reserve Infantry Regiment 16 (c. 1914–18)
Hitler (far right, seated) with his army comrades of the Bavarian Reserve Infantry Regiment 16 (c. 1914–18) © Bundesarchiv, Bild 146-1974-082-44/CC BY-SA 3.0 de/Image Source: Wikipedia

For this shame, he blamed the Jews and the communists and his only goal was to rebuild Germany into a world power. Therefore, in 1919 joined a political career by being member of the German Workers‘ Party. Soon he became the leader of the political party and renamed it into „National Socialist German Workers‘ Party“, or simply Nazi Party. The interesting fact is that in 1923 he was imprisoned because he was part of the coup d’etat attempt. In there he wrote his famous book: Mein Kampf.

Defendants in the Beer Hall Putsch trial. From left to right: Pernet, Weber, Frick, Kiebel, Ludendorff, Hitler, Bruckner, Röhm, and Wagner
Defendants in the Beer Hall Putsch trial. From left to right: Pernet, Weber, Frick, Kiebel, Ludendorff, Hitler, Bruckner, Röhm, and Wagner © Bundesarchiv, Bild 102-00344A / Heinrich Hoffmann //CC BY-SA 3.0 de/Image Source: Wikipedia

In April 1930 he used the Nazi propaganda in order to influence the Germans for the next elections and also his „wrong imprisonment“. Therefore, the Nazis gained incredible supporters among the Germans and they managed to won significant seats in the 1930 elections and since then, the Nazi Party became an important one.

One by one

At first, you must consider that Adolf Hitler became the Chancellor of Germany at the end of January 1933. In short time after his „rise“, he started the Gleichschaltung. For example he planned to take full control of the entire country’s political and economical institutions. Another example is that the home of the German Parliament was set on fire and the Nazis claimed that it was a communist plot to overthrow the Nazis from the government.

Das Andere Deutschland's final issue, announcing its own prohibition (Verbot) by the police authorities on the basis of the Reichstag fire decree
Das Andere Deutschland’s final issue, announcing its own prohibition (Verbot) by the police authorities on the basis of the Reichstag fire decree © Image Source: Wikipedia

The next day, Hitler issued a document: „For the Protection of the People and the State“ which allowed them to control all the citizens and arrest all the communists leaders. However, as you probably think as well, many historians believe that the fire was started by the Nazis.

…until it is the only one

The legal basis for Hitler’s dictatorship was created after the pass of the Enabling Act. An act the only the Social Democratic Party voted against it. After that important moment, the Nazi’s had the full control over the country and of course, outlawed the Social Democratic Party. Now, with no other opposition in the government, the Nazis disbanded all the political parties one by one.

Adolf Hitler addressing the Reichstag on 23 March 1933. Seeking assent to the Enabling Act, Hitler offered the possibility of friendly co-operation, promising not to threaten the Reichstag, the President, the States or the Churches if granted the emergency powers
Adolf Hitler addressing the Reichstag on 23 March 1933. Seeking assent to the Enabling Act, Hitler offered the possibility of friendly co-operation, promising not to threaten the Reichstag, the President, the States or the Churches if granted the emergency powers © Bundesarchiv, Bild 102-14439//CC BY-SA 3.0 de/Image Source: Wikipedia

On July 14, with no other legal political parties, the Nazis passed the Law Against the Establishment of Parties. The Act included that anyone who tries to establish a party will be pushed with penal servitude up to three years.

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